Breanna DeGroot, M.S. Student (Biological Sciences)

B.S., University of North Carolina Wilmington, 2013 Breanna is a Masters student who joined the lab in January 2017. She is conducting research to compare habitat use, fine, and large scale migration of spotted eagle rays in both the Indian River Lagoon and Sarasota Bay. This information will fill fundamental knowledge gaps and may lead to continued conservation efforts for the species in the US and abroad. Breanna joined the team after conducting research with Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota where she worked as a research assistant with the Ray Conservation Program. She also spent time with the Ocean Acidification Program at Mote’s Summerland Key facility conducting studies to better assist coral restoration efforts.  She graduated with honors in marine biology from UNC-Wilmington.  While there she published a paper on the effects Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDC’s) had in a cosmopolitan fish, the inland silverside. Breanna has also been heavily involved with outdoor education; she has spent the past 4 years educating toddlers through adults on various marine issues through captivating and engaging techniques.

B.S., University of North Carolina Wilmington, 2013

Breanna is a Masters student who joined the lab in January 2017. She is conducting research to compare habitat use, fine, and large scale migration of spotted eagle rays in both the Indian River Lagoon and Sarasota Bay. This information will fill fundamental knowledge gaps and may lead to continued conservation efforts for the species in the US and abroad. Breanna joined the team after conducting research with Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota where she worked as a research assistant with the Ray Conservation Program. She also spent time with the Ocean Acidification Program at Mote’s Summerland Key facility conducting studies to better assist coral restoration efforts.  She graduated with honors in marine biology from UNC-Wilmington.  While there she published a paper on the effects Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDC’s) had in a cosmopolitan fish, the inland silverside. Breanna has also been heavily involved with outdoor education; she has spent the past 4 years educating toddlers through adults on various marine issues through captivating and engaging techniques.

Cameron Luck, M.S. Student (Biological Sciences)

B.S. North Carolina State University, 2015 Cameron is a Masters student who joined the lab in January 2017. His research is focused on characterizing the aggregation patterns and spawning behaviors of bonefish (Albula vulpes) found in the Florida Keys and various islands of the Bahamas. This information will help inform management and supplement a stock enhancement protocol for facilitating the rehabilitation of this species.  Prior to joining the Ajemian Lab, Cameron worked as a research technician with the Center for Marine Science and Technology in Morehead City, NC, where he assisted in the development of an extensive acoustic telemetry array for monitoring movement and mortality of weakfish (Cynoscion regalis). He has also been involved in mark-recapture studies to assess release mortality in a variety of reef complex and pelagic species. Cameron graduated with a B.S. in Environmental Science from North Carolina State University with a focus in both applied ecology and marine biology. While there, he conducted research on a certain digenean trematode and its effect on the condition of several piscivorous fish in the Pamlico sound, NC

B.S. North Carolina State University, 2015

Cameron is a Masters student who joined the lab in January 2017. His research is focused on characterizing the aggregation patterns and spawning behaviors of bonefish (Albula vulpes) found in the Florida Keys and various islands of the Bahamas. This information will help inform management and supplement a stock enhancement protocol for facilitating the rehabilitation of this species.  Prior to joining the Ajemian Lab, Cameron worked as a research technician with the Center for Marine Science and Technology in Morehead City, NC, where he assisted in the development of an extensive acoustic telemetry array for monitoring movement and mortality of weakfish (Cynoscion regalis). He has also been involved in mark-recapture studies to assess release mortality in a variety of reef complex and pelagic species. Cameron graduated with a B.S. in Environmental Science from North Carolina State University with a focus in both applied ecology and marine biology. While there, he conducted research on a certain digenean trematode and its effect on the condition of several piscivorous fish in the Pamlico sound, NC

For additional information on the MS graduate programs in Biology at FAU, please visit the following website.