Steven Lombardo, M.S. (Integrative biology - marine science program)

 email:  slombardo2018@fau.edu   Steven is a PhD student who joined the lab in June 2018.  His research is focused on identifying and characterizing habitat used by  juvenile bonefish ( Albula vulpes ) in the Florida Keys .  Identifying habitat that stewards recruitment of this recreationally important species is vital to implementing protections to aid in the restoration of the Florida Keys bonefish population.  Prior to joining the Ajemian Lab, Steven completed his B.S. in Biology at the University of Akron in Akron, OH, and a M.S. in Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at NC State University’s Center for Marine Sciences and Technology in Morehead City, NC.  Under the advisement of Dr. Jeffrey Buckel, he worked closely with the NC Division of Marine Fisheries to assess spawning habitat use and characterize the spawning migration phenology of anadromous alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis), collectively known as river herring.  He has also regularly been involved with the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Southeast Fisheries Independent Survey (SEFIS), assisted in mark-recapture studies to estimate release mortality of reef and pelagic fish species, and has worked professionally as a creel clerk for Ohio Department of Natural Resources, and as a radiological chemist.

email: slombardo2018@fau.edu

Steven is a PhD student who joined the lab in June 2018.  His research is focused on identifying and characterizing habitat used by juvenile bonefish (Albula vulpes) in the Florida Keys.  Identifying habitat that stewards recruitment of this recreationally important species is vital to implementing protections to aid in the restoration of the Florida Keys bonefish population.  Prior to joining the Ajemian Lab, Steven completed his B.S. in Biology at the University of Akron in Akron, OH, and a M.S. in Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at NC State University’s Center for Marine Sciences and Technology in Morehead City, NC.  Under the advisement of Dr. Jeffrey Buckel, he worked closely with the NC Division of Marine Fisheries to assess spawning habitat use and characterize the spawning migration phenology of anadromous alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis), collectively known as river herring.  He has also regularly been involved with the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Southeast Fisheries Independent Survey (SEFIS), assisted in mark-recapture studies to estimate release mortality of reef and pelagic fish species, and has worked professionally as a creel clerk for Ohio Department of Natural Resources, and as a radiological chemist.